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Rhubarb Wine


Rhubarb Wine

Ingredients:

5 lb rhubarb
6  pts water
2.5 lb Sugar
0.5 oz Precipitated Chalk
0.25 tsp Tannin
1 tsp Nutrient
1 Campden tablet, crushed
1 pkg Wine Yeast

O.G. 1.095-1.100

Procedure:

Place chopped rhubarb and sugar in fermenter. Mix well. Cover w/plastic sheet for 24 hrs. Crush rhubarb. Pour HOT water over the crushed rhubarb and stir vigorously. After a bit, scoop the rhubarb into a straining bag and squeeze as much of the juice out as possible.

Discard the pulp. Add the grape juice. Add the next 5 ingredients. Check and adjust (if necessary) the gravity of the must (should be 1.110) Check and adjust (if necessary) the temperature (should be 75 deg F). (The recipe doesn't say to, but it seems to me that you should wait 24 hrs before adding the yeast so the Campden tablets don't kill it too). Ferment at 75 deg F, rack to secondary, ferment @ 65 deg F, rack to tertiary, etc., until clear. Bottle. Age 6 months. Bottle.

Age 6 more months. Drink.

"For old fashioned German rhubarb wine, add to either recipe 0.75 oz ginger root (bruised) and 0.75 oz cloves per gallon. Tie up in straining bag, suspend in must, and remove when must reaches 1.040"


Rhubarb Wine

There are two things that you have to know about to make good rhubarb wine: 1) Chop up your rhubarb stalks and freeze them in plastic bags for a few days before you make the wine. I really don't understand why this should make a difference, but it does. If you use fresh rhubarb the wine never comes out as good. 2) You have to have patience. Rhubarb wine can taste uninteresting at eight months and really good at ten months. You have to let it mellow.

Ingredients:

3 pounds rhubarb
3 pounds white sugar
1 tsp. yeast nutrient
1 gallon hot water (doesn't have to be boiling)
2 campden tablets (crushed)
wine yeast

Procedure:

Use frozen cut up rhubarb. Put it in the primary fermentor (a "kitchen-size" clean plastic garbage can works really well) along with the sugar. Cover and let stand for 24 hours. Add the hot water, mix everything together and then strain out the rhubarb. Put the liquid back in the primary fermentor and when it is luke-warm add the rest of the ingredients. Cover and leave it to ferment for three or four days. Then siphon the liquid into gallon jugs with fermentation locks. There will be a fair amount f sediment, so when the wine settles a bit (about a month) you will want to rack it. Be sure to top up the bottles. We bottle ours at about 6 months. This last year I made one batch of straight rhubarb and the other batch was mostly rhubarb with about a pound of green grapes crushed and thrown in as well. Both were entirely drinkable, but the one with the grapes added was definitely better.


Rhubarb Wine

Among the shelf loads of imported exotics, it's easy to overlook common or garden rhubarb. Yet this highly underrated 'fruit' has much to recommend it. Heather Mairs thinks pink.

Ingredients:

3 lb/1.25kg rhubarb
3 lb/1.25kg sugar
1 sachet general purpose wine yeast. 

Procedure:

Wipe the rhubarb, but do not peel.

Chop into small pieces. Place in a large howl and cover with sugar.

Leave overnight Until the sugar has dissolved. Strain off the syrup and cover the rhubarb with water to rinse off any remaining sugar. Add this liquid to the syrup and make it up to 1 (UK) gallon with water and a cup of cold black tea to add astringency.

Add the wine yeast and transfer the liquid to a demi-john fitted with an airlock. Leave to ferment. Using a hydrometer, Stop fermentation using two Campden tablets when the reading reaches around 1.01. Leave the wine to clear naturally; alternatively use a vegetarian clearing agent e.g. Bentonite. Pour the wine into sterilized bottles, and leave for a minimum of 3 months. If kept in a cool place the wine may be stored for up to two years.


Rhubarb Wine

Ingredients:

3 lbs.       rhubarb (stalk only)
1/4 pt.      white grape concentrate or 1/2 lb. of light raisins (chopped)
7 pts.       water
2 1/4 lbs.   sugar
1/4 tsp.     tannin
1 tsp.       yeast nutrient
1            campden tablet (crushed)
1 pkg.       wine yeast (champagne)

Old Fashioned German Rhubarb Wine

Ingredients/Procedure:

3 lbs.       rhubarb (stalk only)
1/4 pt.      white grape concentrate or 1/2 lb. of light raisins (chopped)
7 pts.       water
2 1/4 lbs.   sugar
1/4 tsp.     tannin
1 tsp.       yeast nutrient
1            campden tablet (crushed)
1 pkg.       wine yeast (champagne)

Procedure:

add the following in a linen straining or "hop" bag from the start of fermentation until SG 1.040:

3/4 oz.   fresh ginger root (chopped)
3/4 oz.   whole cloves

You will probably want to sweeten rhubarb wine back up a little before bottling by adding 1/2 tsp. stabilizer (sorbate) and 1/4 to 1/2 lb. dissolved sugar (or to taste) per gallon.

Makes 1 gal.


Rhubarb Wine

Ingredients:

6 (Imperial) lbs Rhubarb
2.5 (Imp) lbs sugar
1 (Imp) gallon water
1 oz. precipitated chalk
2 tsp citric acid
1 Campden tablet
Yeast (and nutrient)

Procedure:

It recommends garden rhubarb from late May, cleaned and chopped. Add 2/3 of the water and 1 Campden tablet. Leave for 3 days, stirring it twice a day. Then strain the fruit and press it dry. Add the chalk to the resulting juice; when the fizzing subsides, add the remaining ingredients and ferment.


Rhubarb Wine

Ingredients:

12.50 lb Rhubarb (cubed)
5.00 ga Water
12.50 lb White granulated sugar
5.00 ea Campden tablets
50.00 oz White grape concentrate (optional)
5.00 pk Montrachet wine yeast
5.00 ts Yeast nutrient
1.25 ts Grape tannin

Procedure:

Cut up rhubarb and put in primary fermentor. Pour dry sugar over fruit to extract juice. Cover with plastic sheet and allow to stand 24 hours. Put pulp in a straining bag (I use a new laundered pair of panty-hose) and add water and Campden tablets (to kill any "wild" yeasts) and dissolve well. Let stand another 24 hours. Add remaining ingredients including yeast. Ferment 48 hours. Remove pulp bag and squeeze as much of the juice into must as you can. Put the spent pulp in your mulch pile for the garden. Stir the fermenting must twice a day to break up the "cap" that forms on the surface. In 3 or 4 days (or when hydrometer reading is 1.040 or lower) siphon into a five gallon glass jug or carboy and attach fermentation lock. Rack again in 3 weeks. Make sure all containers are topped up. Rack again in 3 months. When wine is clear and stable, bottle. Wine may be sweetened to taste at time of bottling with sugar syrup (2 parts sugar to 1 part water). Add 2 stabilizer tablets per gallon (or follow directions on package if using powder) to prevent renewed fermentation. To preserve color and flavor add 1 antioxidant tablet per gallon.

Starting specific gravity should be 1.090-1.095, Acid .60%, Age 6 months

Caution:

This wine may have you giving back things that you never stole.

Servings: 5 gallons


Rhubarb Wine

Use three pounds of sugar to three pounds of rhubarb per gallon of finished wine. Slice the rhubarb thinly, cover with dry sugar, and wait until the sugar has gone to juice. Strain off the juice and wash out the sugar that has remained in the pulp by stirring in water and straining again. Add yeast and ferment.

Ingredients:

12 lb. rhubarb, chopped
1 qt. white grape concentrate
10 lb. sugar
6 qt. hot water
2 tsp. yeast nutrient
4 tsp. liquid tannin
2 tsp pectic enzyme
8 Campden tablets, crushed
8 qt. cold water
1 pkt. Champagne yeast
finings
1/4 tsp. sulfate crystals
8 oz. wine conditioner

Procedure:

Place rhubarb and sugar in primary fermenter, stir, cover for 24 hours. Crush rhubarb (they suggest a potato masher) Pour in hot water, stir vigorously. Scoop rhubarb into a straining bag and squeeze as dry as possible. Discard pulp. Add grape concentrate, mix well. Add remaining primary ingredients, except yeast, mixing well. SG should be 1.110, temperature should be 75 degrees F. Rehydrate yeast and add to primary. Keep in a warm place (75 degrees). Fermentation should have begun within 24 hours.

When SG reaches 1.020, rack into a clean carboy, topping with cold water. Attach fermentation lock. Move to a cooler location, ideally 65 degrees.

After 10 days, or SG 1.000, whichever comes first,rack into a clean carboy. Top with cold water.

After 3 weeks or SG .090-.095, whichever comes first, rack into a clean carboy, add finings, top with cold water. Let rest 10 days.

Rack into primary fermenter, then filter into a clean carboy. Add sulfite crystals, dissolved in a small amount of water. Top with cold water.

Bulk age 6 months. Add wine conditioner and bottle. Bottle age 6 months.

Comments:

I can't tell you how either of these tastes; I only found them about a week ago, when I noticed that the rhubarb in my garden was approaching readiness. The first recipe is a bit vague for my tastes -- how much yeast? What kind? I will probably end up using Montrachet wine yeast. The second recipe is too chemically-oriented for me, but that's no reason not to pass it along. Good luck in your endeavors, and if any other interesting recipes come your way, please forward them.


Rhubarb Wine

Ingredients:

12 lb      Rhubarb
1  qt      White grape concentrate
10 lb      sugar
6  qt      HOT water
2  tsp     Yeast nutrient
4  tsp     Liquid tannin
2  tsp     Pectic enzyme
8          Campden tablets (crushed)
8  qt      COLD water
1  pkt     Champagne wine yeast

Procedure:

Place chopped rhubarb and sugar in fermenter. Mix well. Cover w/plastic sheet for 24 hrs. Crush rhubarb. Pour HOT water over the crushed rhubarb and stir vigorously. After a bit, scoop the rhubarb into a straining bag and squeeze as much of the juice out as possible.

Discard the pulp. Add the grape juice. Add the next 5 ingredients. Check and adjust (if necessary) the gravity of the must (should be 1.110) Check and adjust (if necessary) the temperature (should be 75 deg F). (The recipe doesn't say to, but it seems to me that you should wait 24 hrs before adding the yeast so the Campden tablets don't kill it too). Ferment at 75 deg F, rack to secondary, ferment @ 65 deg F, rack to tertiary, etc., until clear. Bottle. Age 6 months. Bottle.

Age 6 more months. Drink.


Rhubarb Wine

Ingredients:

3 lb rhubarb
0.25 pint White grape concentrate
7  pt Water
2.25 lb Sugar
0.25  tsp  Tannin
1 tsp Nutrient
1 Capmden Tablet, Crushed
1 pkg  Wine Yeast
O.G. 1.095-1.100

Procedure:

Place chopped rhubarb and sugar in fermenter. Mix well. Cover w/plastic sheet for 2 hrs. Crush rhubarb. Pour HOT water over the crushed rhubarb and stir vigorously. After a bit, scoop the rhubarb into a straining bag and squeeze as much of the juice out as possible.

Discard the pulp. Add the grape juice. Add the next 5 ingredients. Check and adjust (if necessary) the gravity of the must (should be 1.110) Check and adjust (if necessary) the temperature (should be 75 deg F). (The recipe doesn't say to, but it seems to me that you should wait 24 hrs before adding the yeast so the Campden tablets don't kill it too). Ferment at 75 deg F, rack to secondary, ferment @ 65 deg F, rack to tertiary, etc., until clear. Bottle. Age 6 months. Bottle.

Age 6 more months. Drink.


John's 2 1/2 gallons of Rhubarb Wine

Ingredients:

1 gal. rhubarb juice
5 Lbs sugar
2 Tbsp Red Star baking yeast (YEA, I know but I was using what I had on hand)
1 1/2 gal. water

Procedure:

Squeeze the juice out of the rhubarb stalks, if you don't have a wine press freeze the stalks solid then let them thaw in a strainer over a big bowl when they're thawed, squeeze as much of the juice out as you can. Mix in the sugar and pour into your carboy (I have a 2 1/2 gallon one just for wine) or fermenter. Fill with water and shake to mix and dissolve the sugar. Proof your yeast with a cup of water and a tbsp of sugar, or a cup of your mixed juice and water. Pitch the yeast and let it do its thing, this takes about 3 or 4 months before it can be bottled.

Once it clears, rack it into a bottling bucket fill and cap your bottles. I used very old 16 oz soda bottles (when was the last time 7 UP came in 16 oz glass bottles). Let it sit about a month or so in the bottle and it picks up a very light carbonation from the suspended yeast when you bottle. After a year, the carbonation hadn't increased from the first bottle, but the wine went from a rose to a beautifully clear white.

BTW, everyone I gave the wine to raved about how amazing it was.


Rhubarb Wine

Ingredients:

3 lb Rhubarb
2 lb sugar
Champagne yeast
3 mg vitamin B1 tablet
1 level tsp pectic enzyme
1 level tsp yeast nutrient

Procedure:

Wash the rhubarb and slice it length-wise then chop in to 2" lengths. Put it in the bucket and add the dry sugar. After 24 hours the sugar will have dissolved in the rhubarb juice. Remove the liquid and rinse the rhubarb then discard it. Add the other ingredients to the sugary liquid and ferment. Use some grape concentrate as well but remember to reduce the amount of sugar (1kg grape concentrate is equivalent to about 600g sugar).


Rhubarb Wine

This material picked up at local wine store. I haven't tried it yet but am about to, so can't recommend it from my experience! Recipe makes 23 liters.

Ingredients:

15 lb/6.5 kg rhubarb
3 campden tablets (crushed)
12.5 lb/5.5 kg corn sugar
7.5 qt/7.5L hot water
3 tsp yeast nutrient
10 tsp Tannin (powder)
2.5 tsp pectic enzyme
1.5 qt/1.5L white grape concentrate (or red to add some color)
cold water
1 pkg Lalvin EC-1118 champagne yeast
5 campden tablets (crushed)
sparkolloid finings

Procedure:

Place chopped rhubarb in a primary fermentor. Pour sugar over rhubarb and stir together with crushed campden tablets. Cover and leave for 24 hours.

Crush rhubarb with a potato masher or mallet.

Pour hot water over rhubarb and stir vigorously. Next scoop rhubarb into a straining bag and squeeze into fermentor until dry. Discard the pulp.

Add ingredients 5 - 9 (add cold water up to 23l mark)

Check that gravity is approximately 1.110 and adjust with more sugar if necessary.

Verify the must is 65 - 73 or 18 - 23 C. Add yeast to a cup of warm water for 10 minutes and then add to must. Cover fermentor and place in a warm spot.

After 5 -7 days, check the gravity has dropped to approximately 1.020. Transfer wine into a carboy and top up with cold water.

When visible activity has ceased, check that gravity has reached 0.990 - 0.995, and transfer into a clean carboy. Add 5 crushed campden tablets.

Stir wine for several days until carbonation has been removed.

Add finings. When wine is clear it can be bottled.

At bottling time, add wine conditioner to taste.


Rhubarb Wine

For about 4 gallons of finished wine, use the following quantities, 20 pounds of rhubarb stalks, 12 pounds of sugar, 3 1/2 gallons of water. Bakers yeast or wine yeast "starter". Yeast nutrient helps to speed the fermenting.

Lay the rhubarb stalks on a working table and start in the middle of each stalk and crush it. Put the crushed rhubarb in a large polyethylene pail, tub or pottery crock. Add 1 1/2 gallons of boiled water that has been cooled down. Dissolve four grains of sodium metabisulphite for every gallon of "must" in a cup of warm water and stir it in well with the "must". Put on a cover or cover with a sheet of polyethylene with a ball of cotton on one edge and tie it down with a cotton cord. Leave for five days. Then remove the pulp and place it in a clean cloth and wring it out. Put the liquid in a large polyethylene jug or glass bottle. Test the wine liquid or "must" with your saccharometer to ascertain the amount of sugar you need for the alcohol content that you want. Include the water to be added with the sugar. Dissolve half of the sugar in a gallon of water and boil about two minutes. Cool to lukewarm and add. Put on a fermentation lock and leave ferment for about ten days. Dissolve the other half of the sugar in a gallon of water and boil for about two minutes. Cool to lukewarm and add to the "must". Leave ferment until fermentation stops. Siphon or "rack" into another sterilized jug leaving as much sediment behind as possible. Be sure that the jug is filled right up to the top with no air in the jug. Fit a fermentation lock and leave until "polished" or clear. Then siphon into bottles or jugs and cap.

Comments:

Rhubarb leaves are deadly poison and so are the roots. They have been used as poison throughout Europe and Asia for centuries. Be sure to use only the stalks for wine making or eating. Rhubarb, no matter how it is made, makes an acid wine and requires sweetening to tone down the acid taste. Best way to do this is to make your rhubarb wine, then after it is finished, add artificial sweeteners to sweeten it somewhat.


Rhubarb Wine

Ingredients:

[for 23 litres (5 Imp. Gallons)  ]

6.6 kg (14.4 lbs) Rhubarb
1.2 litres (1.2 quarts) White grape concentrate
3.4 kg (7.6 lbs) Sugar
7.5 litres (7.5 quarts) HOT water
11 g (2 1\2 tsp) Yeast nutrient
25 ml (5 tsp) Liquid tannin
7 g (2 1\2 tsp) Pectic enzyme
1.5 g (1\4 tsp) Potassium metabisulphite
10 liters (10 quarts) Cold water
1 pkg Lalvin Champagne wine yeast
1 pkg Enolophin 2 part finings
1.5 g (1\4 tsp) Potassium metabisulphite
290 ml (10 oz) Wine conditioner

Procedure:

Equipment - standard wine making equipment, straining bags, potato masher

Place the chopped rhubarb in the primary fermenter. Pour the sugar over the rhubarb and stir the two together. Cover with a plastic sheet for 24 hrs.

Crush the rhubarb with a potato masher.

Pour the hot water over the crushed rhubarb and stir vigorously. When the rhubarb and water have been stirred, scoop the rhubarb into a straining bag and squeeze it as dry as possible into the fermenter. Discard the pulp.

Add the grape concentrate and mix well.

Add the next 5 ingredients and mix well.

Use your hydrometer to check the specific gravity of the must. It should be 1.070.

When the must is at 23­C (75­F), rehydrate the yeast EXACTLY as per the package instructions and stir in.

Cover the fermenter with a lid or plastic sheet, and keep in a place that is 23­C (75­F).

When the SG reaches 1.020, after about 6 days, rack into a clean and sanitized carboy top up with cold tap water and attach bung and airlock.

Move to a cooler location, one that is about 18­C, (65­F).

After 10 days, or when the SG is at 1.000, whichever comes first, rack into a clean and sanitized carboy and top up with cold tap water.

After 3 weeks, rack into a clean and sanitized carboy, add the enolophin 2 part finings as per the package instructions, top up with cold tap water if needed, and leave for 10 days.

Rack into a clean and sanitized carboy and add 1\4 tsp potassium metabisulphite (dissolve first in 1\4 cup wine), stir well and top up if necessary.

Age in carboy 6 months.

Add wine conditioner, then bottle.

Age in bottle 6 months.


Strawberry Rhubarb Ginger Mead

Sparkling Mead Recipe for 23 Liters

Ingredients:

3.5 kg honey
1 kg corn sugar
100 g freshly grated ginger root
5 g citric acid (approx. 1? tsp)
5 g yeast energizer (approx. 1? tsp)
1.2 kg frozen rhubarb
1.2 kg frozen strawberries
100 g coarsely chopped lemongrass
grated zest of 1 lemon and 1 orange
2 packages Lalvin EC 1118 Champagne yeast
1? g Irish moss (approx. ? tsp) 

Procedure:

Sanitize a 46 liter primary fermenter and lid.

Thaw frozen fruit and mix with corn sugar in the bottom of the fermenter and leave to sit for two days. (Don't worry about the fruit spoiling. The sugar acts as a humectant, preventing the growth of spoilage organisms. Also, if you buy or pick fresh fruit, freeze it before you begin.)

Bring 8 l of water to the boil. Add the honey, grated ginger, citric acid, lemongrass, yeast energizer and Irish moss, and boil for 15 minutes.*

Remove from heat and pour on top of fruits and sugar. Add grated zest at this point.

Allow to steep for 15 minutes and then add enough cold water to bring the level up to 23 l.

When temperature is 20 to 23­C, pitch yeast.

Primary fermentation should take 4 to 6 days. Rack to a carboy. Most of the fruit will be floating on top of the liquid. Use a siphon tube to rack the clear liquid, leaving the fruit and sediment behind.

Secondary fermentation will take 6 weeks. If mead is clear, rack, prime with 1 cup of corn sugar, and bottle. If it is still cloudy, rack to a clean carboy and add Enolophin 2 Part Finings. Rack, prime, and bottle when clear.

Age for at least a month before tasting. Mead will generally improve continuously for 2 to 3 years--if you can keep it that long.

*Or if you want to make your life a little more complicated, you can pasteurize your honey instead of boiling it. If you pasteurize, your mead will retain more honey flavor and aroma.

Pasteurization works by holding the honey at a specified temperature for several minutes. The temperature is high enough to kill wild yeasts and spoilage organisms, but not high enough to boil the honey. (And, given that honey is filthy with wild yeast and bacteria, you must either pasteurize or boil.)

To pasteurize:

At step 3, above, leave the honey out, boiling the other ingredients. After 15 minutes, bring the temperature of the boiling mixture down to between 68 and 71­C (155 -160­F). (Adding 5 to 6 l of cold water should achieve this). Remove the pot from the heat, and dissolve the honey in it. The temperature should stabilize between 60 and 72­C (140-160­F). Apply very low heat and hold the temperature in this range for 5 minutes. Then proceed with step 4.

If you are in any doubt about your temperature for those last 5 minutes, give up pasteurizing and boil everything.

One side effect of this process is that your mead may have a protein haze after fermentation is complete. You can get rid of this by fining with Bentonite.


Strawberry Rhubarb Mead

Ingredients:

1 gallon water
3 lbs. honey
4 cups chopped rhubarb
1 qt. strawberries
2 packets of ale/beer yeast

Procedure:

Meads are not frightening things to make. Actually, they are deceptively easy. The only thing to keep in mind is that EVERYTHING needs sterilizing. Wash out/off all the utensils, pots, tubing, spoons, bottles, and containers with a good sanitizer. B-Br te is a good commercial brand. The second rule of mead is that anything you wash with your sanitizer needs to be very well rinsed afterward with fresh water (no one likes a case of the runs, if you know what i mean). Keeping in mind these two rules, the est is easy:

Boil the honey with 1/2 of the water

As the honey begins to foam, skim the surface with a fine mesh strainer until no more foam bubbles up. Make sure you get the bulk of this, but by no means be fanatical about it. You do have other things to do.

Mash up the strawberries and the rhubarb chunks and put them in the bottom of your plastic brewing bucket. 4: Put the boiled honey in the bucket along with the other 1/2 gallon of water.

Let this mixture cool, as the hot honey will surely kill the yeast.

When the mix is cool (about 85 degrees or thereabouts), add your yeast. PLEASE!!! In the name of all that is good and culinary! Please don't use bread yeast!!! This is NOT the same stuff. Don't send a bread yeast to do a beer or ale yeast's job It WILL NOT WORK!!! At this point, cover your bucket and put an air lock on top and put it someplace that wont be disturbed.

When the air lock slows down to bubbling once every 30 seconds or so, your mead is just about done. This part of the brewing process takes anywhere from three weeks to two months depending on your climatic conditions. You can, when you think it might e done, remove the airlock sanitize and rinse off a straw, and put the straw through the airlock hole for a taste to see if it's done. You will want to bottle it when the honey sweetness is all gone.

When it comes time to bottle this wondrous elixier, sanitize a bunch of plastic soda bottles. This will make about a gallon of mead so clean as many bottles and caps as necessary. Sanitize and rinse a piece of PVC tubing (the hose kind that you can get at your local hardware store). Now comes the fun part. Invite your favorite person over to help you fill the bottles. You want to get as much of the mead out as possible without getting any of the pulp mixed in. Strain the mead through a big strainer or colander (that has been sanitized and rinsed) and into another bucket or pot. Take the PVC tubing and create a vacuum type affair (you remember from sixth grade science putting the bucket on the table and all of your bottles on the floor... if you don't remember, e-mail me and I'll explain it.) and siphon your mead into bottles. This really does work best with another person to help, but it can be done with one.

Put your freshly bottled mead in the refrigerator for about a week (if you can stand to wait that long). The result is more than worth the effort put in. You cannot buy anything that compares to this on the market. Really.


References:



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